One Fine Day in the Middle of the Night by Anonymous

One fine day in the middle of the night,
Two dead boys got up to fight,
They lived on the corner, in the middle of the block,
On the second floor of a vacant lot.
One was blind and the other couldn’t, see
So they chose a dummy for a referee.
A blind man went to see fair play,
A dumb man went to shout “hooray!”
Back to back they faced each other,
Drew their swords and shot each other,
A deaf policeman heard the noise,
And came to arrest the two dead boys,
A paralysed donkey passing by,
Kicked the blind man in the eye,
Knocked him through a nine inch wall,
Into a dry ditch and drowned them all,
A mute onlooker shrieked in fright
And a lame man danced at the ghastly sight
If you don’t believe this story’s true,
Ask the blind man he saw it too!

The Sparrow

Glad to see you, little bird;
‘Twas your little chirp I heard:
What did you intend to say?
“Give me something this cold day”?

That I will, and plenty, too;
All the crumbs I saved for you.
Don’t be frightened–here’s a treat:
I will wait and see you eat.

Shocking tales I hear of you;
Chirp, and tell me, are they true?
Robbing all the summer long;
Don’t you think it very wrong?

Thomas says you steal his wheat;
John complains, his plums you eat–
Choose the ripest for your share,
Never asking whose they are.

But I will not try to know
What you did so long ago:
There’s your breakfast, eat away;
Come to see me every day.

The Great Adventurer by Anonymous

Over the mountains
And over the waves,
Under the fountains
And under the graves;
Under floods that are deepest,
Which Neptune obey;
Over rocks that are steepest
Love will find out the way.

When there is no place
For the glow-worm to lie;
When there is no space
For receipt of a fly;
When the midge dares not venture
Lest herself fast she lay;
If Love come, he will enter
And will find out his way.

You may esteem him
A child for his might;
Or you may deem him
A coward from his flight;
But if she whom love doth honour
Be conceal’d from the day,
Set a thousand guards upon her,
Love will find out the way.

Some think to lose him
By having him confined;
And some do suppose him,
Poor thing, to be blind;
But if ne’er so close ye wall him,
Do the best that you may,
Blind love, if so ye call him,
Will find out his way.

You may train the eagle
To stoop to your fist;
Or you may inveigle
The phoenix of the east;
The lioness, ye may move her
To give o’er her prey;
But you’ll ne’er stop a lover:
He will find out his way.